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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
, please. mr. reid: i'll are start over again, madam president. i ask unanimous consent that on thursday, that's today, december 13, at a quarter till 2:00 the senate proceed to executive session to consider the following nominations, calendar numbers number 830, 832, there be 0 minutes for dwaid debate equally divided in the usual form, upon the use or yielding back of that time the senate hat proceed to vote with no intervening action or debate on calendar number number 830 and 832 in that order. that the motion to proceed be considered made and laid on the table with no intervening action or debate and there would be no further motions in order. and any statements related to this matter be printed in the are appropriate place as if given and the president be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection, so ordered. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to a period of morning business until 1:45 p.m. today with senators permitted to speak up to ten minutes each. fu
of giving u.s. workers and businesses a chance to compete and vote in favor of pntr. i might add, madam president, i want to pretty much thank my colleague from utah, senator hatch, who is a very good person. we have worked very closely together. the two of us make a good team to get this legislation passed. mr. hatch: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from utah. mr. hatch: i want to praise the distinguished chairman of the committee. he has done a wonderful job on this. of course it's been a pleasure to work with him. madam president, this bill marks an important step forward in our relations with russia and moldova. once this bill is signed into law, our workers, job creators and farmers will be able to take full advantage of russia and moldova's ascension to the w.t.o. -- accession to the w.t.o. the bill citrus strong enforcement provisions to ensure that russia lives up to its international trade obligations. finally this bill will help advance human rights and the rule of law in russia. today's vote would not be possible without the combined efforts of many dedica
on the intelligence committee for a long time, i do not have, madam president, the faintest idea of what anybody's talking about are respect to a dossier. so senator udall and i followed that up as well. we asked the director to clarify that statement. we asked -- and i quote -- "does the n.s.a. collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans?" so that, too, is a pretty straightforward question. the questions that senators have been asking about this are not, you know, real, you know, complicated. if you're asking whether the national security agency is addressing these privacy issues, i think it's one of the most basic questions you could ask. does the national security agency collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? and if the agency saw fit, they could simply answer that with a "yes" or "no." instead, the director of the agency replied that while he appreciated our desire to have responses to those questions on the public record, there would not be a public response forthcoming. so to go over the exchange again, the dir
today. madam president, across the country, americans are lamenting that lack of progress in negotiations to avoid a massive tax increase on middle-class families -- and i really share that frustration. consider yesterday's failure, the disabilities convention at the hands of the tea party. this shouldn't have been a battle, but extreme elements of the republican party picked a fight where there was nothing to fight about. 38 republicans voted against the convention, including several who are on record supporting it, even cosponsors of it. this treaty already ratified by 125 countries would hold foreign nations to the same high standard of treatment that the united states already maintains for people of disabilities. and it would sative american citizens traveling and working abroad, and that's hundreds of thousands of people right now. the treaty has the support of veterans groups, disability groups from around the country, virtually all of them. it wouldn't cost the taxpayers a single penny. it wouldn't require any changes to existing united states law, and the issue is
attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new bridge over the indian river inland. you can ask the atlantic ocean to the delaware. that's a new bridge could be spent over $200 million on the bridge in the last several years. a lot of federal money, quite a bit of state. this is the old bridge. it disappeared. it's gone. this is a highway to the old bridge. ron. four months ago people make their way up and down the east coast. today the bridge is completely gone along with highway approaches. the new bridge are threatened and we want to make sure we've made a $200 million investment that we don't use the bridge. until the bridge can work underwater. unfortunately you can't get to the bridge and the beaches of rio to the easter pÂtÉ densities to be there argonne and they need to be replaced. thank you. in addition, a huge breach fewell -- with the delaware bay and delaware r
. madam president, it has been difficult to envision the day when i would be saying farewell to the senate. just as it was impossible to imagine that i would one day become a united states senator as i was growing up in maine. such is the miracle of america that a young girl of a greek immigrant and a first-generation american who was orphaned at the age of nine could be elected to serve in the greatest deliberative body the world has ever known and become the third longest serving woman in the history of the united states senate. in contemplating how to begin my remarks today, i am reminded of the words of the renowned pellett -- poet, ralph waldo emerson. give thanks continuously. because all things that contributed to your advancement, you should include all things in your gratitude. that perfectly encapsulates how i am feeling on this day, madam president -- thing fall and last. i first and foremost want to thank the people of maine for allowing me to be their voice, their boat, and their champion for 16 years in the -- their vote in the u.s. house of representatives and for three term
. altmire: thank you, madam speaker. i appreciate it. i will not speak for nearly 60 minutes. i'm tempted to engage the gentleman, my good friend, mr. woodall, in debate, but i won't do that because i know he's still smarting from his bulldog's loss over the weekend and i'm going to let him continue to think about that. i very much enjoy the friendship and camaraderie with mr. woodall, we do have a difference of opinion on some of those issues. before i start, madam speaker, i would say to the group, the individual who will be speaking following my presentation, that i plan to only speak for about five minutes. or less. so this will not be an hour-long presentation. so the speaker who will follow me on the majority side i would recommend they hang near the floor because i will be wrapping up shortly. madam speaker, i rise to commemorate the 50th anniversary of laroche college. founded in 1963 by the sisters of divine providence in mccandliss, pennsylvania, a suburb of pittsburgh, it was named in honor of ma reap laroche, the first superior of the congregation of the sister of divine provi
: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. sanders: i would ask unanimous consent to be able to speak as if in morning business until senator leahy arrives. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. sanders: thank you. madam president, what i was just suggesting is there are ways to do deficit reduction that are fair. the first point, in terms of $4 trillion over a ten-year period, we have already cut over $1 trillion in terms of spending , $1.1 trillion. number two, i think the president is right in suggesting that we have got to ask for significant revenue from the wealthiest people in this country, the top 2% without asking for any tax increases for the bottom 98%. and that would add $1.6 trillion in revenue, bringing us somewhere around $2.7 trillion. so we have a $1.3 trillion problem. that is not over a ten-year period a difficult problem to solve. let me just throw out a few ideas, and i'm sure other people have equally good ideas. madam president, before you cut social security, medicare and medicaid, we might want to address the reality that th
reform. madam president, what i have done today is to lay out a way -- and i know other senators will have ideas and i hope they will bring them to the floor, but i have laid out a way for us to raise the debt ceiling by around a trillion dollars and in return have entitlement reform on a dollar-for-dollar basis, saving and reforming these programs so that seniors in the future certainly will have the opportunity to continue these programs that you depend upon so much and the young people, the young people that are coming behind us will have the certainty that we asthma tour adults i hope have dealt with these issues in an appropriate way. so, madam president, i thank you and i yield the floor. mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. corker: i notice the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. merkley: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon is recognized. mr. merkley: i ask the quorum call be set aside. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. merkley: thank
for the immigration of its citizens, affecting mainly soviet jews. it was controversial in its time. madam president, people said why are we connecting human rights to trade? why is the united states doing that? after all, trade is so important. well, we did it and it made a huge difference, and we were able to get soviet jews out of the soviet union. we spoke for western values in our trade legislation. we protected the rights of individuals that refused this. when i first came to congress 26 years ago, i joined the congressional caucus for soviet jewry. i wore the wristbands. 25 years ago, i marched in washington, a march for soviet jews. we stood up for basic rights, and we changed the landscape on this issue. i had a chance to be with natan sharansky and celebrate what he meant to freedom around the world. we initiated that with jackson-vanik. it's a proud chapter in american history. today we end that chapter because jackson-vanik is no longer relevant to the human rights challenges of our time. but with the passage of the sergei magnitsky accountability act, we meet the challenges of our time.
may testify about what she knew and when maybe. good news for madam secretary and john kerry whose appointment is on hold while the republicans decide whether to wait to hear from ms. clinton before approving him. bad news for the four dead americans. steins, smith, doherty and woods. hillary's testimony is months overdue. i hope mrs. clinton backs up her promise and "i take full responsibility for benghazi." i hope you do, madam secretary. i hope you don't let the men die without answers. i hope a lot. in sports and business once you hope, you have already lost. she will come back and testify. then what? >> kimberly: this is disappointing. why do we put a push on for her to come do the right thing. this f she has a health issue, she has a health issue. concussion, memory loss? i don't know. this you seems suspicious. >> eric: you call this a mess. >> andrea: i don't buy this. i am not sure if she testifies we get answers anyway. clinton are not always the most forthcoming in testimony when they are sworn under oath. i hope the g.o.p. senators can three questions. the first, why wa
grow the economy. any questions? >> madam leader, you talked about comprehensive tax reform >> i said katrina, not sandy. i was still thinking of katrina. we have to address the needs. and if i just may say that, thank you, whoever just put that there. was that you? we had to do this before, where we had an impasse with a disagreement with the executive branch and the legislative branch. at that time, it was katrina. but the important message every day that we didn't pass something for katrina really caused great apprehension in that region and with individuals living there. and it is the same thing with sandy. where is the confidence they will get if they see we want this little bit now, and maybe this little bit now, and you can't spend that now? no, it's not about only what can you spend now; it's what you can plan on now. so, the timing is really important for sandy, as well, as it was when we had a similar impact because of the iraq war that people were concerned would hold up the katrina funding. yes, ma'am? >> speaker boehner said there's no point in raising tax rates for the
's condition, so anything i'm about to say is about this disorder in general and not about madame secretary. you know, blood clots are common. they affect over 400,000 individuals in the united states annually. and there are certain situations that put us at higher risk. for example if we have an injury and we're put to bed for a couple weeks and we're 20 years of age then we maybe have a 20% likelihood of developing a blood clot. if we're 60, it may be higher, approaching 60%. so the situations put us at higher risk for blood clots. >> what about if you've had it before? the new york daily news is reporting that back in 1998 she had a blood clot behind her left knee. is a recurrence common? >> like many illnesses blood clots are really the summation of risk factors. what i mean by that is you may inherit something. you may be put into a situation and they come together and show itself. there are certain inherited things that give us blood clots at a usually low risk. then if we're put in a situation such as put to bed rest that risk can increase. if you've had a previous clot you are at hi
tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: madam chairman, madam speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume to thank both the ranking member, the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, for his longtime support, as well as the gentlewoman from california, ms. lofgren, whom i'm sure will have a word to say about this as well, and also the work that the gentleman from north carolina, the ranking member of the subcommittee that i chair, and he has done a good job as ranking member on, for working with us to find ground here that we could reach agreement upon. i will also say that i have a great interest in looking at the electronic communications privacy act and other privacy issues that need to be reviewed and modernized and hope that in my new capacity as chairman of the judiciary committee in the next congress we'll have an opportunity to work together on issues of that nature. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from north carolina is recognized. mr. watt: madam speaker,
in this situation. senator vitter? >> thanks, madame chair. i want to make three points briefly. first of all, again, i want to express my real sympathy for all the victims of sandy. this was a horrible, devastating disaster, wiping out homes, businesses, and livelihoods and it has a tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i'm certainly supportive of acting quickly in terms of help and aid that is going to directly, immediately help those victims. we also need to do that in a thoughtful and responsive -- responsible way with the american taxpayer in mind we can do both of those things. so i certainly support that. secondly on the s.p.a. side i think there is good news and there is room for counting improvement. the good news i do think we've come a long way, positively since katrina and rita. and the s.p.a. disaster response has been improved. the response in 2005 was slow an inadequate before steven preston took over and turned the program around and it has improved since then. were able to work on this committee in a bipartisan to write and enact further reforms that the senator mentio
. these remarks are 15 minutes. >> madam president, it is very difficult for me to rise today with a heavy heart, to bid aloha, aloha to my good friend, colleague and brother, daniel inouye. it is hard for me to believe the terrible news i received is true. senator inouye was a true patriot, an american hero in every sense. and he is, at this time, in hawaii, the greatest leader. he served his country as a soldier, receiving the -- highest honor our nation can be so. when we think of how he began to serve his nation, it was difficult to believe the difficulty in hawaii as japanese americans to be a part of our nation's military, they were denied, they were considered aliens of this country. but he was one of those that wanted to serve his country and they went to the highest level to receive, to receive the dignity, and eventually they were given the honor to serve our country and as we now know, they became the greatest unit in military history with the most decorations of any unit and also with the highest level of decoration of the medal of honor. he served as a leader, the third longest serv
leader and most certainly the democratic leader as well. so, madam president, the hour is getting late, both figuratively and actually. we don't have much time to settle an issue that will affect the economy of this country. and last but not least, i am sure the president does not want on his watch to have a calamity like this happen, and i don't want on my watch as one who is leaving the senate this year for this to be the last thing that happens on my watch, and i don't think anyone here is going to benefit from a calamity happening in this country's economy, even for a few days, because it just looks like we can't govern, and it's time to realize that on a bipartisan basis, we can do some things that won't be universally liked and it won't be liked by everyone in this room or anyone in this room 100% because we're not going to get everything that we think is right. but we can move our country forward. we can help everyone in this country, every taxpayer, but we're not going to raise taxes to spend more. we should be saying okay, if there's going to be a threshold that pays more taxe
. >> is there an objection to the original request? >> yes, i reject. -- i object. >> whiplash. >> madame president. >> what just transpired deserves a word. senator mcconnell came to the floor this morning and offered a change in law that would help us avoid the kind of obstruction and the kind of showdowns we have had in the past over the debt ceiling. in fact, the idea was not new. it was his original idea that has been the law of the land that followed. and he offered and challenged senator reid to bring this matter for consideration by the senate. he said he would bring this to a vote in 20 minutes. and we would decide up or down whether the debt ceiling problem would be resolved once and for all under senator mcconnell proposal. and then senator mcconnell objected, say, no, no, we need 60 votes. for those who do not follow the senate, 60 votes is equivalent to a filibuster vote. so this may be a moment in senate history when a senator made a proposal, and when given a opportunity for a vote, he filibustered his own proposal. i think we have reached a new spot in the history of the senate we have never
said because it touched me. he said: madam president, i wish to step back in history if i may. on december 7, 1941, something terrible happened in hawaiile three weeks later the government hoff the united states declared that all japanese americans, citizens born in the united states or of japanese ancestry were to be considered enemy aliens, at a result, like these undocumented people, they could not put on the uniform of this lan. senator inouye went on to say, i was 17 at the time and naturally i resented this because i loved my country and wanted to put on the uniform to show where my heart stood. but we were denied. so we petitioned the government. the a year later they said, okay. i if you wish to volunteer, go ahead. senator inouye said, well to make a long story short, the rem meant i serve in, made up of 0 japanese americans had the highest casualsed in europe and the most tech crated in the history of the ute. then he turned and said i think the beneficiaries of the senator from illinois and the dream act will do the same. it was the type of short statement which cap
. and i'd like to read what he said. it touched me. he said madam president, i wish to set back in history. on december 7, 1941, pearl harbor bombed hawaii. that was declared all japanese-americans on the americans, citizens born in the united states or had japanese ancestry would be considered enemy aliens. as a result, they could not put i love my country and wanted to put on a uniform to show her my heart said. we petition the government. and they said if you wish to volunteer, go ahead. he turned and said that i think the beneficiaries of the senator from illinois in the dream act will do the same. it was a short statement that was captured in a few words his life and his sacrifice and what he had proven by risking his life for this country. the reason that we honor him this morning. i closed by saying two things. first, i think senator akaka came to the floor at last night about his colleague of so many years and put it in a few words. he said last night, tomorrow will be the first date since why became a state in 1959 that dan inouye will not be representing us. he went on to say tha
as well. so, madam president, the hour is getting late, both figuratively and actually. we don't have much te to settle an issue that will affect the economy of this country. and last but not least, i am sure the president does not want on his watch to have a calamity like this happen, and i don't want on my watch as one who is leaving the senate this year for this to be the last thing that happen on my watch, and i don't think anyone here is going to benefit from a calamity happening in this country's economy, even for a few days, because it just looks like we can't govern, and it's time to realize that on a bipartisan basis, we can do some things that won't be universally liked and it won't be liked by everyone in this room or anyone in this room 100% because we're not going to get everything that we think is right. but we can move our country forward. we can help everyone in this country, every taxpayer, but we're not going to raise taxes to spend more. we should be saying okay, if there's going to be a threshold that pays more taxes, they should know it's going to bring down the defici
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)